Friday, December 26, 2014

Inspirational Reading - Part 7

Time to continue looking at sources for Inspirational Reading for games. This time I start looking at the individual authors listed in Appendix N.

Poul Anderson is listed first, and there are three specific novels mentioned. Anderson is probably best known for his science fiction. Like a lot of authors in the appendix, though, his science fiction occasionally incorporates fantasy elements and he wrote some straight fantasy as well. Of the three novels mentioned, Three Hearts and Three Lions and The Broken Sword are fantasy. The High Crusade blends science fiction and fantasy.

Aside from the mentioned books, I am including a few more from Anderson in my list. The Ys series is historical fantasy set in the time of the Roman occupation of Britain and incorporates fantasy elements related to the legendary city of Ys in Brittany. I'm also adding his novels about King Harald Hardrada. The end of his reign is considered the end of the Viking age and his travels and career may have had some influence on Robert Howard when he was writing his Conan tales.

That adds the following to the reading list:

Anderson, Poul; Anderson, Karen. Dahut (King of Ys 3)
-----. The Dog and the Wolf (King of Ys 4)
-----. Gallicenae (King of Ys 2)
-----. The Golden Horn (The Last Viking 1)
-----. The Road of the Sea Horse (The Last Viking 2)
-----. Roma Mater (King of Ys 1)
-----. The Sign of the Raven (The Last Viking 3)

Next on the list in the appendix is John Bellairs' The Face in the Frost. I first read Bellairs in grade school, starting with The House with a Clock in its Walls, The Figure in the Shadows, and The Letter, the Witch, and the Ring. I recognized the name when I first read the DMG, but wasn't able to find a copy of The Face in the Frost until recently. Since this is his only adult fantasy novel, it's the only one I am including in the list.

As an aside, Bellairs was a faculty member at my undergraduate alma mater for a year prior to writing The Face in the Frost. According to various bits of online biographies, he taught at Shimer College for a year in 1966 then moved to Bristol, England for six months, where he wrote Face.

Next up I'll take a look at Leigh Brackett

3 comments:

  1. Hi, Bob. Long time, no see! Hope you had a merry Christmas. I didn't know Anderson wrote fantasy; failing to research authors is a flaw in my character, methinks... I'll be looking forward to your piece on Leigh Brackett, though. She did the screenplay for Hatari, which remains to this day my favorite movie.

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  2. Anderson's The Merman's Children, The War of the Gods, and Hrolf Kraki's Saga are all worth reading too.

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